• Welcome to the Keyglove project: a feature-rich, wearable, wireless glove that translates motion and touch into computer control.

  • The v0.4 design with a cotton handbell glove served me well and even made into a prominent article in my local newspaper!

  • This is an older v0.4 kit design with a battery mount that is hacked together for testing. Holding components to the glove with wires like this is simple, but not a permanent solution.

  • The biggest challenge is the physical construction, currently done by hand and pretty tedious. Merging complicated electronics and clothing well is not easy.

  • The Keyglove was exhibited at the Maker Faire NYC event on September 17 and 18, 2011. The exposure and feedback were excellent. We also participated in the same event in NYC in 2012, along with the Open Source Hardware Summit.

The Keyglove is an innovative new way to interact with your technology. A wearable, wireless, open-source input device, the Keyglove provides unprecedented flexibility and convenience for gaming, design, art, music, data entry, device control, 3D object manipulation, and even inexpensive telepresence. The Keyglove uses customizable touch combinations and gestures to enter text data, control the mouse, switch between applications, perform multiple operations with a single action, and even have some fun with equipping weapons, attacking, and defending in MMORPGs and other games.

In addition to being an efficient and complementary accessory for current technology, the self-contained, full-featured Keyglove is also a perfect device for the fledgling wearable computing market, since it eliminates the need for miniaturized, impractical QWERTY-based keyboards. Since the Keyglove is built to support physically relaxed single-handed operation, it is also perfect for handicapped or disabled users, or those who are prone to or suffer from RSI-related injuries.


Keyglove Introduction from Jeff Rowberg on Vimeo. More Keyglove videos are available here.


Because the glove design allows for multi-sensor combinations, the keyglove provides exponentially more possibilities than many other glove-based input devices (prototypes or commercial products). 37 strategically placed contact sensors and smart controller software make it possible to implement the entire English alphabet using simple one-to-one sensor contacts. Since the glove also includes multi-sensor contacts, there are many hundreds of ergonomically usable combinations. The sample touchset shown here is based on the concept behind the stenographer’s keyboard to keep commonly adjacent letters physically close to each other.

The glove is currently in the prototype stage with no consumer-ready units. For up-to-date development news, check out the News page (RSS here), like Keyglove on Facebook, or follow the project on Twitter at @keyglove.

Once the prototype is working, I will add more thorough step-by-step instructions to the How to Build page (which currently has some info, but it is incomplete since the prototype is also incomplete). You may also be interested in a list of Similar Devices I’ve come across on the internet recently, either to satisfy your curiosity, or out of a need for inspiration, or possibly to look for a product that might be more suited to your needs.

And, of course, you can always contact me with any questions, comments, ideas, etc. Or, for more fun and to help others out, visit the Keyglove Forums instead!